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I've listened to Salieri's Falstaff. It isn't on a par, not even almost, with Mozart's best-known operas (I haven't heard most of his early ones), and it definitely can't stand alongside Verdi's comic masterpiece of the same name. It's pleasant, though, and might make for a good theatrical evening.
Interesting. And have you listened to the Danaïdes ans the above mentioned operas ?
 

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No. Falstaff didn't leave me with a burning curiosity to hear more, but I'm willing to believe that some of the other operas are good. Cecilia Bartoli's Salieri album contains some very attractive arias.
I guess I’ll find out soon enough. All the operas of Mozart present in Gardiner’s box were pure gems for me. I don’t know any other CLASSICAL era composer (maybe Gluck but he sounds sometimes like late baroque, it’s true I don’t know him enough, neither Picini his rival) that can please as much as Mozart for Opera yet.
 

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I guess I’ll find out soon enough. All the operas of Mozart present in Gardiner’s box were pure gems for me. I don’t know any other CLASSICAL era composer (maybe Gluck but he sounds sometimes like late baroque, it’s true I don’t know him enough, neither Picini his rival) that can please as much as Mozart for Opera yet.
 

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I don’t know any other CLASSICAL era composer (maybe Gluck but he sounds sometimes like late baroque, it’s true I don’t know him enough, neither Picini his rival) that can please as much as Mozart for Opera yet.
Andromeda e Perseo

Requiem, his "most famous" piece (written for the death of his employer, and (coincidentally) after his only daughter died in her infancy, in the same year)
 

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+MH118, a work full of "memorable melodies";

You may still think it's not on par with Mozart's, but keep in mind it's an early work (1769). The late works (and the oratorios from the early 1770s, Kaiser Constanstin I. Feldzug und Sieg MH117, Der reumütige Petrus MH138, Der büssende Sünder MH147, Passione Dominum nostrum Jesu Christe MH202) have not been recorded. (These could be the "game-changers"; we don't know yet.)
+ Der Schulmeister MH204, Der Englische Patriot MH285, Beschluss-Arie MH295, and especially Die Ährenleserin MH493 (1788), which is said to contain greater boldness of chromatic language, Lied-like qualities of the northern tradition (as opposed to coloratura) than Haydn's earlier works, and 3 instances of homage to Mozart's Don Giovanni.
Ich suche die Natur. Edle Wahrheit! Zeig die Wege, wo ich selbe finden kann. Mach das Mark des Geistes rege, zeig mir deine Tritte an. Lass mich finden, aus was Gründen eine Kunst beträchtlich sei. Weg mit Schmink' und Tandelei! Ich suche die Natur.
I seek Nature. Noble Truth! Show the ways where I can find the same. Stir the spirit's depths; show me your steps. Let me find for what cogent reasons an art merits consideration. Away with decoration and ostentation! I seek Nature.
 

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+MH118, a work full of "memorable melodies";

You may still think it's not on par with Mozart's, but keep in mind it's an early work (1769). The late works (and the oratorios from the early 1770s, Kaiser Constanstin I. Feldzug und Sieg MH117, Der reumütige Petrus MH138, Der büssende Sünder MH147, Passione Dominum nostrum Jesu Christe MH202) have not been recorded. (These could be the "game-changers"; we don't know yet.)
Michael Haydn very very good call yes. On my list !
it’s unbelievable the amount of treasures that are still unrecorded all over the place. From operas to piano, to concertos, etc.
I’m not gonna complain too hard though. A few days ago I did a very fast estimation of how much music I could hope to listen to before I die...
What a terrible thing. If I was totally rational I would stick to the ”main course” main repertoire (I‘m far from having listened to all the operas) yet I’m still stocking up on all kinds of lesser known material (that I actually listen to, for example right now, Lorely by Bruch, which I enjoy very much).
I do this thing with the woman where I tell her my age for each composer.
For example, with Chopin, I’m a 100 years old. There’s absolutely nothing left for me to discover in Chopin. I’ve listened to ever works many times, and many interpretations. Being a 100 years old gives some satisfaction, it’s nice to have this familiarity, etc.
But it’s also a bit sad, for obvious reasons.
A few years ago, I told her I was 5 years old for Wagner !!!!!
Same for Mozart !!!! What an exciting thing to be so young with giant geniuses ! The excitement of the discovery and integration and appreciation is great.
Although I’m pretty old now for many of the great classics, Bach, Mozart, Berthoven, Brahms, Bruckner, etc etc etc...
The fact that I’m still a todler with Verdi, Donizetti, and many others is an incredible feeling.
For Bellini I’m about 60 years old now.

Edit: actually i just realized I’m a bit older for Verdi. About 8 years old. And I should say unborn for Donizetti.
 

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For Bellini I’m about 60 years old now.

Edit: actually i just realized I’m a bit older for Verdi. About 8 years old. And I should say unborn for Donizetti.
How does that happen ?
I thought everybody is exposed to Verdi and Donizetti earlier than Bellini !??? But I enjoyed so much being (almost) new to Bellini last October.

Btw, if you are a Bellini fan at advanced level, did you ever watch or listen to Giulietta and Romeo by Vaccai ? (They used to play a part of it transplanted into Bellini's opera. And I hope I am not repeating myself, this thread is quite long).
 

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How does that happen ?
I thought everybody is exposed to Verdi and Donizetti earlier than Bellini !??? But I enjoyed so much being (almost) new to Bellini last October.

Btw, if you are a Bellini fan at advanced level, did you ever watch or listen to Giulietta and Romeo by Vaccai ? (They used to play a part of it transplanted into Bellini's opera. And I hope I am not repeating myself, this thread is quite long).
Yes I know I have a weird relationship to opera because for most of my musical listening life I have actively turned my back to it and came late in life to opera, so it’s not a ”natural” path.
@BBSVK the reason why Bellini was the first of my bel canto opera composers is because Chopin worshiped him and was influenced by him. Never forgot this fact since my first musical love, which was Chopin. I was so obsessed with Chopin, I read a few biographies etc etc...I was 15.
Thanks for the recommendations.
 

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I don’t know any other CLASSICAL era composer that can please as much as Mozart for Opera yet.
"Alceste is an opera in German in five acts by Anton Schweitzer (1735–1787) with a libretto by Christoph Martin Wieland. It was commissioned by Abel Seyler for the Seylersche Schauspiel-Gesellschaft, and premiered on 28 May 1773 at the Hoftheater Weimar. Considered a milestone of German opera, it was revived in Weimar and recorded in 1999."

"Mozart wrote that "Alcestis was a great success, and that although it is not half so beautiful as [Schweitzer's] Rosamund. It is true that its success was much abetted by the fact that it was the first German opera. The opera singer, composer and musical theorist Ernst Christoph Dressler described the positive reception of the opera in Weimar in his 1774 book Gedanken Die Vorstellung Der Alceste, Ein Deutsches Ernsthaftes Singspiel (Thoughts on the Presentation of Alceste, a German Serious Opera). He considered it a model for German opera."

Alceste, Act III, Scene 2: "Er flucht dem Tageslicht in seinem Schmerz"
Alceste, Act I, Scene 1: "Zwischen Angst und zwischen Hoffen"
Alceste, Act II, Scene 5: "Sie stirbt, o Gott!"
Alceste, Act IV, Scene 2: "O flieh, Geliebter Schatten, fliehe!"
 
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