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True, but there are some amazing reviewers on Amazon. When I'm ready to purchase an unfamiliar piece or a piece I would like another recording of, I check out 7 or 8 or so regular reviewers who's tastes are simpatico with mine, and make a purchasing decision based on that.

It took a long time to find a bunch of (good and thorough) reviewers that I found have similar tastes, but now that I have them, I refer to them often and it saves me a lot of time. More often than not, I am not disappointed.

V
I agree. Some of the Amazon reviewers are extraordinary, a couple of them, TC members.
 

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Gardiner - period instruments - really top notch.
Another vote for the Gardiner set - it's my favourite overall, I think. Not only a fine rendition of the Requiem, but the Quattro Pezzi Sacri "filler" is a great bonus.

Of the "classic" recordings, it's probably the Reiner (Price, Björling etc) for me. Of more recent vintage, I really enjoyed Antonio Pappano's rendition on EMI/Warner.
 

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True, but there are some amazing reviewers on Amazon. When I'm ready to purchase an unfamiliar piece or a piece I would like another recording of, I check out 7 or 8 or so regular reviewers who's tastes are simpatico with mine, and make a purchasing decision based on that.

It took a long time to find a bunch of (good and thorough) reviewers that I found have similar tastes, but now that I have them, I refer to them often and it saves me a lot of time. More often than not, I am not disappointed.

V
If you are satisfied, who am I to hold you back.:cheers:
 

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I'd probably go with Giulini/Philharmonia (1962)

...though it's a crowded field, and based on the users here, I'm going to have to check out Reiner's rendition.
 

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I will add my all time favorite, since I don't see it mentioned:

Forehead Chin Publication Font History


Despite the dated 1954 sound (albeit in studio), you can't beat this one for sheer intensity and unforgettable commitment. Many may know De Sabata from his Tosca with Callas, considered the greatest opera recording of all time. Unfortunately he made all too few recordings. But he was for me easily one of the handful of greatest conductors we have on record. Unlike Toscanini, he was not only electric but also flexible. Also the chorus is unforgettable as well as the dream team of soloists (the younger Schwarzkopf here is more fierce and agile than in her later recording with Giulini)

"Second place" for me rests with an even older recording - Serafin's 1939 version with Caniglia/Stignani/Gigli/Pinza. The two male soloists are worth the price alone, but the brisk performance as a whole sizzles and sounds great on the Dutton label.

And then I would agree with others on Giulini for a stereo version, with Fricsay not far behind (both stereo and mono). I admire Toscanini's various versions more than I love them.
 

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I will add my all time favorite, since I don't see it mentioned:

View attachment 93381

Despite the dated 1954 sound (albeit in studio), you can't beat this one for sheer intensity and unforgettable commitment. Many may know De Sabata from his Tosca with Callas, considered the greatest opera recording of all time. Unfortunately he made all too few recordings. But he was for me easily one of the handful of greatest conductors we have on record. Unlike Toscanini, he was not only electric but also flexible. Also the chorus is unforgettable as well as the dream team of soloists (the younger Schwarzkopf here is more fierce and agile than in her later recording with Giulini)

"Second place" for me rests with an even older recording - Serafin's 1939 version with Caniglia/Stignani/Gigli/Pinza. The two male soloists are worth the price alone, but the brisk performance as a whole sizzles and sounds great on the Dutton label.

And then I would agree with others on Giulini for a stereo version, with Fricsay not far behind (both stereo and mono). I admire Toscanini's various versions more than I love them.
I only like the mezzo on that recording.
 

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My favourites are tied, also a bit distorted: Giulini Warner 1962 and Solti Decca 1967
The Karajan 70s is also really good and balanced...
Celibidache Warner is really well recorded but too slow.
 

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Watched this yesterday, it's lonely at the top.
This is numero uno for me as well. I have versions by Toscanini, the one on his Immortal Performances RCA CD is outstanding but doesn't match this - maybe the sound gets in the way. I also have the Reiner, one of the Fricsay pair, de Sabata, Muti, Giulini and Serafin. I know this sounds morbid but when a friend, relative or person of great note dies, I play the Verdi Requiem in their honour. Nowadays, it's always this HvK. It can bring me to tears - especially the Recordare and the Lacrymosa.
 

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Hi,

From the age of about 16 I like classical music, that is, as long as there wasn't any singing involved. Later in 1988 I recorded the live performance of Verdi's Requiem by the Koninklijk Concertgebouw Orkest led by Riccardo Chailly from the radio on a cassette. This was the first classical singing I really could appreciate. So I went to the shop to buy Verdi's Requiem on record. But the recordings I listened to weren't as fierce as the one I recorded. So I stayed with my cassette.

Now after having sung opera on an amature level for 12 years with playing and singing Rigoletto as highest achievement, I have decided to be a more serious listener to music and I invested in high quality equipment like a Super Audio CD/DVD player and a 7.2 surround receiver. And so I started looking for a Requiem performance with the tempo and furiosity of Chailly and on a higher quality as my cassette, like Super Audio CD (SACD) or DVD preferably multi channel. So far I have found none (although Colin Davis' SACD version comes close).

Since there are connoisseurs on this forum, I wondered if there were amongst you people who would like to listen to the Chailly version (see link above) and tell me your opinion about it and perhaps even advice me on a recording with the same fierceness as Chailly.

If you want to know what I like about Chailly listen for instance to Dies irae (starts on 12:48). I like the tempo. Only Giulini is faster. But not only the tempo I like. Sometimes Chailly (as Verdi would have wanted) throws a complete orchestra into your living room...BAM. I heard a Karajan version which is massive qua sound but sooo slooow. When I hear his version, I think "Karre Jan!" (which sounds like Karajan and is Dutch for "Step on it Jan").

Well, enough said. I very curious about your opinions.

Kind regards,

Lorenz
 

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Hello Lorenz, like Granate I want to welcome you aboard, you can find a lot of discussion in this thread about the requiem.
I did see that one once but never been a Chailly fan, sorry.
 

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My two absolute favourites are:

Verdi:Requiem
Leontyne Price (soprano), Rosalind Elias (mezzo-soprano), Jussi Björling (tenor), Giorgio Tozzi (bass)
Wiener Philharmoniker, Singverein der Gesellscaft der Musikfreunde, Wien, Fritz Reiner on Decca and very close second:

Verdi: Requiem
Renata Scotto, Agnes Baltsa, Veriano Luchetti and Evgeny Nesterenko
Philharmonia Orchestra & Ambrosian Chorus, Riccardo Muti
Formerly on EMI now Warner
I have the Muti and have just ordered Reiner.
 

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Some time ago I posted my preference for the Giulini/EMI however I must admit that the Verdi Requiem is one of those pieces which I always think that I should like more than I do! I don't mean that I dislike it but it isn't something I want to listen to very often and which doesn't often engage me (translation: frequently bores me!) Having said all that, tonight I have been listening to the Giulini/Proms performance done around the same time as the studio recording and it is really grabbing my attention. I couldn't tell you why more than in the past ... perhaps the live performance, the big Albert Hall acoustics, even the soloists ... whatever, it definitely will get more 'air time'.
 

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Some time ago I posted my preference for the Giulini/EMI however I must admit that the Verdi Requiem is one of those pieces which I always think that I should like more than I do! I don't mean that I dislike it but it isn't something I want to listen to very often and which doesn't often engage me (translation: frequently bores me!) Having said all that, tonight I have been listening to the Giulini/Proms performance done around the same time as the studio recording and it is really grabbing my attention. I couldn't tell you why more than in the past ... perhaps the live performance, the big Albert Hall acoustics, even the soloists ... whatever, it definitely will get more 'air time'.
The Giulini requiem was not one of EMI's most distinguished recordings and actually the live recording from Albert Hall is better. The soloists - though not as internationally well known - are generally as good if not better than the EMI. Certainly Shuard has a more appropriate voice that Schwartzkopf for the part. Then the live performance is just that more vital. I'd certainly go for live rather than the studio effort.
 

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I've just listened to another live Giulini from the RFH on April 26 1964. It's available to listen online via Youtube (there is a BBC video of the performance) or you can hear the BBC Legends CD. It really is worth hearing and while it doesn't knock HvK at La Scala off top spot it comes mighty close.
 
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