Classical Music Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, Baroque... Something has always puzzled me... How do u excatly do vibrato on flute( I know it's possible)...
Is it an involvement of the tongue( as in tongueing/fluttering ) or more of the lips actually? :huh:
:lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
768 Posts
I think I know what you mean...as I tried my first notes, I did it, but than it is a "wrong" vibrato, because only the volume and pressure is vibrating not the frequency :mellow: , or am I wrong?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
163 Posts
Yes, pulsing on the flute is done basically by pushing air from the diaphragm, many times throughout the course of holding a note; instead of just plain holding the note you are sort of making it into many notes that run into each other without using the tongue. That is the best I can explain it.

As far as vibrato is concerned I am definitely not a fan of it! <_< I like pulsing, but I dislike vibrato and have never done it. ;) The difference between the two, as far as I can understand, is that vibrato involves slight pitch change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, pulsing on the flute is done basically by pushing air from the diaphragm, many times throughout the course of holding a note; instead of just plain holding the note you are sort of making it into many notes that run into each other without using the tongue. That is the best I can explain it.

As far as vibrato is concerned I am definitely not a fan of it! I like pulsing, but I dislike vibrato and have never done it. The difference between the two, as far as I can understand, is that vibrato involves slight pitch change.
Hmmm... interesting. So there's a difference between the 2. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
I don't really know how it works, but I can do a pretty good vibrato on my recorder when my lungs (and mood) are in a good shape. it comes almost completely from my diaphram, the thing is, with the recorder, vibration in air pressure results in minute variation in pitch, I don't think it works the same on the flute though, I think it would only result in pulsing (if I understand that concept correctly). however, on the recorder I am supposed to be able to do something called a flattement (sp? french :unsure: ), which involved trilling on the edge of the hole, producing something like a vibrato, however, the way I understand it, they only use it in french music ;) .

perhaps an instrument more related to the flute (although I have no personal experience with it), would be the arabic nay, basically a reed (not bamboo), with seven holes in the front and two in the back (one of them is never touched, it makes the sound more "airy" and "open"). the way people vibrato on it is rather complicated, there is the same pulsing from the diaphram to give it that undulating feel, however, the lips are also used, as the nay is end blown, varying the embouchre produces a very defined pitch difference, I also understand that the throat or tongue is also supposed to be doing something :blink:

horribly complex, (what is even harder is the arabic technique of playing in two octaves at the same time, which produces this throaty hoarse texture, very suitable for miserable music).

I would suppose the flute functions relatively similar, (regarding breath and embouchre).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I agree with whoever said it's like laughing. Just keep pulsing HAHAHAHAHA over and over again. Start out slowly to make it even, and the more you practice, the faster it will get. That's what I learned for oboe several months ago. I still can't get it on oboe, but when I picked up the flute, I had an automatic natural vibrato. Flute's one of the easier instruments to get vibrato on.
 
G

·
Hi saxoboe, you have got it, right on, just keep breathing hahahahaha into the mouth piece it is easy, for fast vibrato let it come from the throat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
The way I learned vibrato was to do slow crescendos and decrescendos and gradually increase the tempo and decreasing the note lengths. So, a general method would be to cresc./decresc. for whole notes and then gradually go to halfs, quarters, etc. until they mesh into a relatively stable tempo. However, I agree that vibrato can be unnecessary, which is often the case in quick passages.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top