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Do you feel "guilt" about listening to old favorites?

  • Sometimes

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  • Never

    Votes: 47 87.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The eternal problem that affects all classical listeners, no matter their tastes, listening habits, or background is simple: There are not enough hours in the day, and too much music to listen to.

Because of this, I've sometimes felt legitimately guilty about putting on a piece I know I love, like Berlioz or Reich, rather than explore. This is especially the case when I've found composers off the beaten warhorse path that I legitimately treasure from exploring - Saygun, Rzewski, Schnittke, Feldman.

Does anyone else ever feel "guilt" about putting on Beethoven 7 again rather than looking elsewhere? If so, how do you deal with it? Do you simply say that music is for pleasure, and putting on a piece that deeply affects you is a worthy use of time?

Personally I've sometimes split my time between exploring and "pleasurable" listening, but this can have the unfortunate effect of making exploration seem like homework - the old cliché about music (especially modern music) being vegetables that you listen to because they're good for you.
 

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I marked never, as I don't feel guilty about listening to any work I enjoy; I would feel guilty about not listening to what gives me pleasure just because that may not be fashionable. Besides, I'm not always in the mood to explore new works - at some moments, listening to some well-known masterpiece is all I need.
 

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Hey! When the battle finally reaches your stable door, which ride will you choose to meet it on? Right! And you'll be thankful for that ol' warhorse, with his full throttle of experienced reliability and comfortable familiarity.

Just hope the fellow you're facing selected the newbie pony ride. If so, you'll sit reassured in a well-worn saddle on a fine quad of hooves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey! When the war finally comes to your stable door, which ride will you choose to meet it on? Right! And you'll be thankful for that ol' warhorse, with his full throttle of experienced reliability and comfortable familiarity.

Just hope the fellow you're facing selected the newbie pony ride. If so, you'll sit reassured in a well-worn saddle on a fine quad of hooves.
Is this about classical music, horses, or a 1998 Ford Taurus?
 

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I spend a lot of my listening time exploring the fringes of the repertoire. But sometimes I get a deep yearning to put on some old warhorse - and when I do it is always a very satisfying listen. The thought goes through my head that this work is a beloved warhorse for good reason! It's GREAT! Most of the orchestras I play with program only those warhorses; that's what brings an audience in, and despite my complaining about always playing the same old repertoire, playing things like Brahms 1st, Beethoven 5th, Tchaikovsky 5th, Schumann 4th reminds me of why I was so attracted to classical music in the first place. No guilt, just frustration that there's so much music and so little time.
 

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For a couple of years already over 95% of my listening to classical music has been determined by going systematically through my CD collection (alphabetical per composer) to physically store them in cabinets so I know where they are and to make a masterlist in the computer. That includes all my CD's, from 1986 until now. Some I've listened to dozens of times, some just a few times and there are a good many that I had not even listened to once (cheap or free downloads, thrift store finds I could not resist). As a result my daily listening is usually a blend of the familiar, less familiar and new anyway. And I never get tired of the warhorses (who made up most of my CD's in the early years). When I finally come to the V, I will even enjoy the four seasons again.
 

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I spend a lot of my listening time exploring the fringes of the repertoire. But sometimes I get a deep yearning to put on some old warhorse - and when I do it is always a very satisfying listen. The thought goes through my head that this work is a beloved warhorse for good reason! It's GREAT! ...
This is exactly my view. The vast majority of my listening is to works I've never heard before or might have heard once but likely don't remember. When I do hear what others call warhorses, I'm stunned by how beautiful, engaging, and interesting they are.
 

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I get what you mean. I have so much new music to listen to, but when I put on a Beethoven symphony I feel slightly guilty that I don’t listen to a Sibelius symphony for the first time. I still have to listen to Finlandia and I even started a whole thread on it. So when I put up something I know I’ll enjoy I feel like I should listen to something new that I know I’ll probably like anyway
 

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I have no qualms about listening following my pleasure whatsoever.
However, since several years I do tend to avoid buying new recordings of works already well represented in my collection. So if for some reason I nevertheless get another disc with a Beethoven symphony or Goldbergs or Mozart piano concerto etc. I sometimes feel a bit guilty, or at least think that I need a pretty good reason adding a 5th, 10th or 20th recording.
Sometimes I do things like ArtRock described but on a much smaller scale, i.e. I decide to systematically listen to a certain "neglected" section of my collection or so.
 

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I know musicians who performed almost anything when they were young, but in the later phase of their performing career concentrated on a few important composers, like Klemperer, Arrau.. I am not saying I, purely a listener, can be compared to these great musicians (but listeners are indispensable still) but as I know I have not many years left I do not want to waste (?) my time in exploring marginal repertoire. To be honest, I never like those stuff, as my long-departed friend used to call them 'alien droppings.' 😚😛
 

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My listening habit is usually driven with the output of a particular composer in mind rather than a bunch of miscellaneous works by various composers, so if there happens to be any usual suspects in whatever I have by whoever then they don't get played any more or any less than anything else. In a nutshell this means I don't get to favour better-known works by playing them in isolation, so I suppose one advantage is that there's less chance of my getting bored with them.
 
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My listening habit is usually driven with the output of a particular composer in mind rather than a bunch of miscellaneous works by various composers, so if there happens to be any usual suspects in whatever I have by whoever then they don't get played any more or any less than anything else. In a nutshell this means I don't get to favour better-known works by playing them in isolation, so I suppose one advantage is that there's less chance of my getting bored with them.
Amazing diligence in crafting the playlists for your ongoing projects as seen in "Current Listening" - My compliments - For the past two weeks, my "listening project" has literally consisted of playing my way through the stack of discs that I knocked off of a shelf and have been picking up off the floor because I'm too lazy to re-stack them.
 

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Amazing diligence in crafting the playlists for your ongoing projects as seen in "Current Listening" - My compliments - For the past two weeks, my "listening project" has literally consisted of playing my way through the stack of discs that I knocked off of a shelf and have been picking up off the floor because I'm too lazy to re-stack them.
Thank you. Decades ago with my rock stuff I had a tendancy to play some albums far more than others, which led to a kind of "warhorse" situation. My listening these days - at least where classical is concerned - is far more democratic, I think. 🙂
 
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