Classical Music Forum banner

Do you feel "guilt" about listening to old favorites?

  • Sometimes

    Votes: 7 12.7%
  • Never

    Votes: 48 87.3%
81 - 91 of 91 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,152 Posts
Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Wasn't it John Cage that talked about the perception of music, especially recorded music, as something to fill voids? Not in a positive way, mind you, he was speaking of stuff like background music in department stores.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,601 Posts
I think that our discomfort with voids and a sense of urgently needing to fill them is related to instant gratification. Before smartphones and portable devices, when we where waiting for an appointment, at a bus stop or in a long queue for some reason, most of us would do something like read a newspaper, chat or stare idly into the distance. Today, with any such gap to fill, its common to feel unease and then take out the device.

Its gotten to the point that people pay to go on retreats to have a break from their devices. These offer opportunities for meditation and you leave all devices at the door when you enter. An acquaintance of mine went and found that memories of all sorts arose which he'd completely forgotten about. I've done what's called a digital detox on some weekends, which is similar although all my other regular activities where as normal.
For best results, take everything in moderation. Including the many substances, and some music theory lessons.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,601 Posts
Wasn't it John Cage that talked about the perception of music, especially recorded music, as something to fill voids? Not in a positive way, mind you, he was speaking of stuff like background music in department stores.
I got the impression that Cage was offering an idea similar to mine below;

You mount your camcorder out the window (your choice of window). Then turn on some CM, quite loud (for the recording). Find a nice road with some traffic, not too much. Start recording.
When you get to view the video it might appear to be an interesting 'composition'.

I've done it, more than once, and I've some successes. If you change the music at the right time, it should improve the clips. Take a copilot along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,232 Posts
Wasn't it John Cage that talked about the perception of music, especially recorded music, as something to fill voids? Not in a positive way, mind you, he was speaking of stuff like background music in department stores.
Correct. He didn't own any sound recordings, and only wanted his own music to be available in small runs. He also had a network through which he distributed tapes of it, which wasn't on any commerical basis. I've found his ideas about recorded music and mindfulness useful in terms of dealing with information overload, which is even more relevant now than it was in his time. I went into a bit of detail on that here:


For best results, take everything in moderation. Including the many substances, and some music theory lessons.;)
Agreed, although I've never had music theory lessons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,232 Posts
It's the same as giving up or forgetting some helpful concept(s) you currently have about music.
I don't know where you're coming from because I didn't talk about music theory. I also don't understand why I should be forgetting concepts (whichever ones you mean) that I find useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
I only feel anything self-conscious (guilt, regret) when I realize I've been ignoring a piece of music or musician unjustly. That rarely happens with anything I'm familiar with. One great thing about classical music is that I keep finding new discoveries to keep me interested, but I have to sort through the duds to find them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,601 Posts
I don't know where you're coming from because I didn't talk about music theory. I also don't understand why I should be forgetting concepts (whichever ones you mean) that I find useful.
I mean, it's the same as missing a big piece. But you would only notice if you miss it.

Walk us through how you learn to appreciate a work that's new to you. A work that you believe is highly recommended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,601 Posts
I only feel anything self-conscious (guilt, regret) when I realize I've been ignoring a piece of music or musician unjustly. That rarely happens with anything I'm familiar with. One great thing about classical music is that I keep finding new discoveries to keep me interested, but I have to sort through the duds to find them.
Good to see you, VO.

Yes, for me CM is a large world of music. It doesn't have the annoyances of pop and some jazz, but it has its own annoyances (personally to be avoided).
 
  • Like
Reactions: philoctetes

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,232 Posts
I mean, it's the same as missing a big piece. But you would only notice if you miss it.
I still don't understand, this is too cryptic for me. What am I missing, exactly? Just say what you're thinking.

Walk us through how you learn to appreciate a work that's new to you. A work that you believe is highly recommended.
Following up a cryptic comment with a direct question shows that you can communicate directly. I would be willing to answer your question, but I see little use of doing that. Why ask me questions if you can't even give me a clear answer? I'm here to talk, not to trade questions with more questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,437 Posts
I don't have warhorse guilt but occasionally someone has tried to inflict it on me:
  • one of my music theory professors -- an avant-gardist -- after I had performed the Grieg Piano Concerto: (dismissively) What do you think about it as a piece of music? Me: (defensively) Er, yeah, well I think the second movement is quite beautiful ... Him: Hrmff (and strode off).
I actually do like the Grieg Concerto still, but more to the point is that from a pianist's perspective it's usually a good idea to have some solo "warhorses" ready no matter what the cognoscenti think -- pieces like Bach's chorale prelude Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring, Debussy's Claire de lune, Rachmaninoff's C# Minor Prelude, Chopin's Minute Waltz, Schumann's Traumerei, Brahms's Waltz No. 15 in Ab Major, Gerschwin's Prelude No. 2. And yet if you do, someone will be on your case for playing "warhorses."
 
81 - 91 of 91 Posts
Top