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What are your ‘New Year’s Resolutions’ for your playing?

In 2017 I decided to work through ‘Thistle & Minuet’ with my baroque bow & my fiddle teacher (a baroque specialist) and I’ve almost completed the project - just moving on to the last one, Oswald’s Thistle Sonata. There are some fabulous ‘Scottish traditional’ style tunes in that book: I especially love ‘Low down in the broom’, ‘The New Bridge of Edinburgh’, & ‘The New Bridge of Ballater’. My favourites out of the baroque art-music tunes are the Thistle Sonata, and a wonderful Minuet in A, with variations by mystery-man William McGibbon. :)

For 2018, I mean to -
* learn all the Niel Gow tunes on Pete Clark’s cd 'Even Now’. And play them as well as I can.

* finally get somewhere with vibrato so that my long notes and slow airs can sound a bit better.

* I’m getting there on speed - but I want to be able to play a Scots reel fast enough for dancing.

* enjoy myself!
We have two traditional music school holidays booked for me on fiddle and John on keyboard and concertina. Plus, we’re looking forward to seeing if John can go to the Swaledale Squeeze in spring, and I’ll take my fiddle along.

Hey - how lucky we are to have this musical retirement.

As long as I live and my health holds it will be ‘my fiddle my joy’. :)
 
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The BWV 1001 Fugue is one for my favorite pieces. Not easy to play.
None of his fugues is easy on a string instrument! I'm trying to get Segovia's guitar transcription of Bach's Chaconne back under my fingers. His version has fallen out of favor with its filled out textures, but I read that he was inspired by Busoni's piano version, one of my favorite pieces, so that's good enough for me!
 

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Well, I'm very occuppied with my composition duties, but on the offside I'm hoping to do a good job of performing Haydn's C concerto (with my own contemporary cadenza of course ;) ), Brahms E minor sonata (just 1st movement), Bach cello suite number 2, and Kol Nidrei.
 

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Three days ago I started working with a new teacher. I have worked with her in an ensemble, string orchestra, but not individually. I feel a little like I've betrayed my previous teacher with whom I've worked off and on for twenty years. I wanted to work with this new teacher because she knows the modern repertoire better than my previous teacher. My previous teacher is great, and very generous with his time, but what he knows mostly ends at music written before 1900. He was born behind the iron curtain and educated in the Russian school and then played in baroque orchestras before coming here.

With my new teacher I've started to learn the Prokofiev Solo Violin Sonata and then I'll move onto learning The Lark Ascending and Aaron Copland's Violin Sonata. My previous teacher knew Soviet music, but not Anglo American twentieth century music.

My new teacher is a member of our local professional orchestra and she performs Chamber music also. She's very busy with performance and teaching, so my lessons right now are irregular whenever she can fit me into her schedule and mine. She went to music school in the 70s and 80s in America. One of her teachers was Gingold, another originally from the Russian school. My new teacher is great, very friendly and supportive. She has many adult learners.

Immediately what was different was that I as sight read the Prokofiev, she played along with me. That helps me find the notes. I got through the first movement in the first lesson. She knew the piece well because she's recorded it, and performed it multiple times. We ended the lesson sight reading Leclair Sonata for two violins. She says that we'll end every lesson playing duets, something I need more practice with.
 

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right now, I'm pretty busy

I am working on the Giuliani Rondos op 68, it is a guitar/piano duet were both instruments are on even footing. I perform that on the 13th

I am also working on several sets of pieces for violin and guitar. I play with a retired symphony violinist and we are booked pretty much every weekend in February and March.

then I am playing a couple of solo things up at my Church, but I have to cover more than an hour, so I have about 100 minutes of solo material to get ready to perform. I'll be reading for this, so least I don't have to memorize the program, but about half the material is taken from my solo recital program anyway, so its already on the brain box

all together its about 3 and a half hours of music that gets performed over the next 10 days

...and that doesn't count the gig Saturday with my jazz trio

but this is why I do it. Its always great fun to be busy. I love it when every time I leave the house, I have an instrument case in one hand and a folder of music in the other :D
 

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I am currently working on Haydn G major concerto, last movement of Brahms A major sonata and the first movement of the Kabalebski con erto. The first two are coming along nicely, but the Kabalevski is a lot harder than I had anticipated
 
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Bach's Lute Suite No.2 transcribed for guitar by Sharon Isbin--just the Prelude and Fugue at the moment. Whoa, the Fugue is a beast! Most scholars now think his Lute Suites were written for the lautenklavier, a keyboard instrument that plucked the keys much like a lutenist would, and sounded like a lute, which explains the extreme difficulty of some of the counterpoint and notes that cannot be sustained for the noted duration.
 
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The first movement from Nikita Koshkin's Sonata No.1 for guitar--it's a beast! This video is not great, but he plays the daylights out of it!

 

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Had a great lesson with Taggart & my fiddle teacher on keyboard playing the whole 24 Apted tunes.

This week's practice will concentrate on playing Playford in parts. This is a new skill for the raw home duo, but very satisfying, and good for us musically too, I think.
 

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I neglected this thread, sorry.

The teacher I started working with February of last year couldn't seem to fit me into her schedule and so I got ditched. Disappointing really. She's good. So I haven't had lessons for about 16 months. That's usually not a problem, but I like to have lessons once in a while to help me with something new and keep my playing fresh and improving.

I've started with another new teacher. Two lessons already. This teacher lives upstairs and over two apartments. She's a local professional playing with the opera orchestra. She also occasionally plays with the symphony orchestra. She comes downstairs to my place. This is brilliant because I can spend time prior warming up, and spend time immediately after practicing what we've just done. She's giving me a $5 discount because we're neighbours.

I'm working on The Lark Ascending by Vaughan Williams. I started this once before about 5 years ago, but it went no where. This new teacher has performed it, she knows it well. She's got some good fingering and bowing. I will possibly perform this at a masterclass in July. It's a masterclass full of adult amateurs like me. Not too much pressure. I've performed in previous years too.

Last week we had a lesson in the afternoon and then I saw my new teacher (and previous teacher) perform Also Sprach Zarathustra with the local professional orchestra.

Two more lessons are scheduled. I'm going to ask her if she wants to continue giving lessons. But at $75 per hour the price does add up quickly.
 
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