Classical Music Forum banner
6701 - 6720 of 6726 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
I just started this, but it's quite gripping already. From the publisher: "Blending breathtaking suspense with astonishing empathy, Notes on an Execution presents a chilling portrait of womanhood as it simultaneously unravels the familiar narrative of the American serial killer, interrogating our system of justice and our cultural obsession with crime stories, asking readers to consider the false promise of looking for meaning in the psyches of violent men."
Book Poster Font Publication Advertising
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,578 Posts
What are everyone's favorite Classics?

This was my favorite genre to read when I was reading a lot. I love the excellent prose and sophisticated language. Some favorites include but are not limited to:

Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles.
Shelley's Frankenstein.
Fitzgerald's This Side of Paradise.
Wells' War of the Worlds.
Stoker's Dracula.
Stevenson's Jekyll & Hyde.
Carol's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Lewis' The Magician's Nephew.
Parrie's Peter Pan (the Disney film is quite like the novel).

Those are what pop into my head right away. Lots of 19th and 20th century literature.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,630 Posts
What are everyone's favorite Classics?

This was my favorite genre to read when I was reading a lot. I love the excellent prose and sophisticated language. Some favorites include but are not limited to:

Doyle's The Hound of the Baskervilles.
Shelley's Frankenstein.
Fitzgerald's This Side of Paradise.
Wells' War of the Worlds.
Stoker's Dracula.
Stevenson's Jekyll & Hyde.
Carol's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
Lewis' The Magician's Nephew.
Parrie's Peter Pan (the Disney film is quite like the novel).

Those are what pop into my head right away. Lots of 19th and 20th century literature.
Believe it or not, I read all 1400 pages of Les Miserables. I liked it.

But for classics, I like Dickens. Never a bad novel. Copperfield is my favorite.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,323 Posts
Believe it or not, I read all 1400 pages of Les Miserables. I liked it.
I probably should read it again. It was the first classic novel (unless I count Treasure Island, I probably should, I love this one as well) I ever read at 12 years old and I read it once again in my late teens or early 20s. It's very long but also quite exciting. Notre Dame de Paris (Hunchback of) is about half the length and mostly more obviously entertaining, except for one or two reflexive quasi-essay that break the action. I highly recommend both.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,578 Posts
I initially read this at night in a very creaky old house in the countryside, of the kind where noises appear from nowhere. I admit to being on edge. The high-backed armchair I was sitting in had its back to the door, so I moved it.
It's extremely well written and does make you consider your dark side; that's what's scariest about it for me.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Here are some of the most highly-regarded books in recent times:
  1. "The Testaments" by Margaret Atwood
  2. "Normal People" by Sally Rooney
  3. "Little Fires Everywhere" by Celeste Ng
  4. "The Dutch House" by Ann Patchett
  5. "Where the Crawdads Sing" by Delia Owens
  6. "Educated" by Tara Westover
  7. "The Overstory" by Richard Powers
  8. "An American Marriage" by Tayari Jones
  9. "The Silent Patient" by Alex Michaelides
  10. "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot
These books cover a range of genres, from fiction to non-fiction, and have received critical acclaim for their engaging stories, well-developed characters, and thought-provoking themes. You can choose the one that interests you the most, or even better, read them all!
 
6701 - 6720 of 6726 Posts
Top