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Ok, ill bite. I would have chosen the Takac's Schubert Quartettsatz but that's only part of that disc so instead I'll go with this stunning pair of warhorses. A case where the performance, interpretation and recorded sound leave the opposition in the dust. Even the cover is cool.

That is the first cd I ever bought myself, and indeed it’s amazing. I bought it for the Rosamunde, I’ve yet to listen to death and the maiden
 

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If we’re purely talking recording, I think most modern recordings should be sufficient so I find that less interesting. But Hyperion and decca are top notch when it comes to sound engineering. If we’re purely talking performance, I would say Schubert symphony no. 8 by Carlos Kleiber. I don’t think anything comes close of any recording ever. Not even his other recordings. I can nitpick about his Beethoven 5 and Brahms 4 and give criticism or cite recording I like more in certain movements like Karajan ‘63 for Beethoven 5 mov 1 or I could say that I prefer Furtwangler 1949 Wiesbaden in Brahms 4 and I would actually listen to it if was better recorded and if it was on Spotify. But I can’t find any criticism in his Schubert 8. He really captured the heart of this amazing symphony
 

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I feel like like an outlier in this discussion (born in 1950) but I don't admire recording-quality as my most important criterion. For my money, what gets me is a superior interpretation of a well-known work. Arthur Grumiaux's lesser-known recording of the Brahms Violin Concerto from 1958 with the Concertgebuow leaves every other recording in the dust, including his own later rendition. Periodically it gets re-released. Standards? The orchestra is superb! Grumiaux's architecture, his taste, and intelligence put me on the floor every time! His double-stopping has an indescribable "royal" flavor. The moods and colors the generates are unusually varied. His ending of the work reminds me of the end of a tragic opera. He does all that by sheer timing mastery. I could go on, or did I already?
Hey, it's up on Youtube! (Turn it up.)
I had never heard this recording, so thank you. I do have to say I still prefer Heifetz. I love the intensity of his playing and the aggressive orchestral playing as well
 
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