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Something I'm curious about: what is that percussion instrument that sounds sort of like the sound you would make by clicking your tongue (but much better, naturally :lol:)? It it some kind of wood block? I've heard it used in classical music. There's so many percussion instruments out there that I find it kind of dizzying. But I'm interested in using percussion in my compositions, and learning about what's out there.
 

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I know just what you speak of. It also sounds like a horse clip-clopping along, right? I have heard them reffered to as just "wooden blocks" before, or just "the blocks." Maybe there is a real name for them, but if there is I don't know it.
 

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It may well be claves, which have a range of sounds because they may be solid or hollow, and can be made from wood, plastic or fibreglass. Hollow wooden blocks are used too, and you may see them in the shape of a skull.
 

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Thanks, Quaverion! I am going to see if there are some on my electric keyboard. I might use them sometime. I am interested in some of hose odd percussion instruments. I like the way Tchaikovsky used varied percussion in his works (except not the cymbals!).
I absolutely HATE Tchaikovsky. I seriously can't put into words how much I hate it. I'm more of a Baroque Man myself. Chopin is really the only Romantic composer I can stand.
 

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I absolutely HATE Tchaikovsky. I seriously can't put into words how much I hate it. I'm more of a Baroque Man myself. Chopin is really the only Romantic composer I can stand.
We should have a long talk.....

Just kidding :p

As you can see, I'm somewhat fond of late romantic, early contemporary composers :cool:

So no Classical for you, then? Other than Tchaikovsky, of course
 

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Temple block is right. Claves sound similar, with a kind of *snap, snap* sound.
I would say Temple Blocks as well. Very cool instrument. Normally come with 5 different tones. Relatively Popular in Concert Band music.

Temple Block solos ftw!
 
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A percussion instrument is any object which produces a sound when hit with an implement, shaken, rubbed, scraped, or by any other action which sets the object into vibration. The term usually applies to an object used in a rhythmic context or with musical intent.

The word "percussion" has evolved from Latin terms: "percussio" (which translates as "to beat, strike" in the musical sense, rather than the violent action), and "percussus" (which is a noun meaning "a beating"). As a noun in contemporary English it is described in Wiktionary as "the collision of two bodies to produce a sound". The usage of the term is not unique to music but has application in medicine and weaponry, as in percussion cap, but all known and common uses of the word, "percussion", appear to share a similar lineage beginning with the original Latin: "percussus". In a musical context then, the term "percussion instruments" may have been coined originally to describe family of instruments including drums, rattles, metal plates, or wooden blocks which musicians would beat or strike (as in a collision) to produce sound.
 

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A percussion instrument is any object which produces a sound when hit with an implement, shaken, rubbed, scraped, or by any other action which sets the object into vibration. The term usually applies to an object used in a rhythmic context or with musical intent.

The word "percussion" has evolved from Latin terms: "percussio" (which translates as "to beat, strike" in the musical sense, rather than the violent action), and "percussus" (which is a noun meaning "a beating"). As a noun in contemporary English it is described in Wiktionary as "the collision of two bodies to produce a sound". The usage of the term is not unique to music but has application in medicine and weaponry, as in percussion cap, but all known and common uses of the word, "percussion", appear to share a similar lineage beginning with the original Latin: "percussus". In a musical context then, the term "percussion instruments" may have been coined originally to describe family of instruments including drums, rattles, metal plates, or wooden blocks which musicians would beat or strike (as in a collision) to produce sound.
 
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