Classical Music Forum banner
221 - 240 of 270 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,620 Posts
My favorite is the Hammerklavier. It was my introduction to the sonatas, from Peter Schickele's radio show, Schikele Mix. He played the fugue in its entirety and ended it with one word: "Wow."

My personal favorite, at least as of right now, is Solomon. The sound isn't the greatest, but the the first time I heard him play the slow movement, I was so transfixed that I had to remind myself to breathe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
The teqhnique in Appasionata(op. 57) and Hammerklavier(op. 106) is extremely difficult but very fun to listen, so I guess they are my favourites. I can't say 8th and 14th are bad though, but I don't think those two are equal to Appasionata or Hammerklavier. But I still respect other people's thoughts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
143 Posts
I love the Pathetique most of all. The last movement of No. 32 is so contemplative and resigned until Beethoven explores the variations - just love it. The Hammerklavier, Appassionata and Waldstein are tremendous.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
The ''Pathétique'' for me as well. I can never get that rumbling C Minor chord out of my head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
They all suck.

Jk it's hard to pick. Beethoven was a master of composition and tone; he could take the simplest motive and turn it into a 45 minute long musical dissertation. A lot can be learned both in technique and composition from all 32 of his sonatas. I choose not to study them or even think much of the pieces themselves because I feel he's too overrated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,011 Posts
In my view Beethoven wrote 30 piano sonatas. I’m always sorry to see the two Op. 49 sonatinas included in the cycle.

Both are early works, written about a decade prior to their publication. They seem intended for beginning pianists and are good examples of their type. They often appear in books of similar pieces by Clementi, Kuhlau, Dussek, and the like, and in that company they are a good fit. But as part of Beethoven’s cycle of full-fledged sonatas, they seem distinctly inferior.

It seems that brother Kaspar sold them to a publisher without Ludwig’s permission, or so the story goes. No bad thing, perhaps, as otherwise the two works might have been lost. But they really shouldn't be considered part of the sonata cycle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,607 Posts
19 and 20 as played by Annie Fischer and Emil Gilels are in no way inferior to any other Beethoven sonata. I can understand how they may be odd ducks of the group based on your post, but the quality is there, and the numbering can not be changed so many years after the fact, so we'll just have to accept 32 as the number in general circles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
I can't pick favorites although I could probably pick a top ten in no order. The last time I was impressed by a Beethoven sonata was just a couple of hours ago when I heard Gulda's excited, frenzied beginning to the Waldstein, lifting me up into a sudden whirlwind blitz of busy grandeur.

My favorite is almost always the one I've heard most recently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
All of them but I have a special memory with Beethoven - Piano Sonata No. 24 in F# major, Op. 78 -À Thérèse and I also love the sound of it on the Fortepiano. Here is a precious contribution by Andras Schiff with his lecture and explanation on this piece who shows great pianism and understanding of this piece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I have one question which regard to learn something from composicion principles with piano sonates. Which is better?... especially as development chords things first of all,
I want choice music one in this two mastters: Beethoven or Tchaikovsky? And what pick up for example in sonates? Number? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,011 Posts
I admit to a life-long fondness for Beethoven’s final three piano sonatas: Opp. 109, 110, and 111. Beethoven had promised his publisher “an opus of three sonatas,” which would have been his first since the Op. 31. But that was not to be since each sonata took about six months to write. So they were published separately, each with its own opus number.

Still, they seem very much a related trio, sharing a warmth and depth of the same sort. They are totally original, owing almost nothing to what had come before; and very little that came after owes much to them, since their specialness is of a sort that can’t be copied.
 
221 - 240 of 270 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top