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I love every note of the Waldstein (21 in C major). The final movement is almost too much beauty to bear. It's one of my top ten musical compositions.

I had been put off these great sonatas by the popularising of themes from a couple of them and had never heard of 21 till the Seinfeld episode in which the gang attend a recital given by George's new girlfriend. George skites that she will be playing the Waldstein and the others affect to be impressed - "Oh, the Waldstein.". It all ends in tears, of course.
 

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Haydn, Mozart, Vivaldi, Wagner
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Pastoral #15 ............
 

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Pathétique, Appassionata, and lately Waldstein (which I didn't realize was such a popular choice, it seems here) are among my favorites, but I love the whole set. They're all so good.

My favorite cycle of them is Schnabel. I also like Kempff and Gilels, but lately it's Schnabel every time.
 

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I love every note of the Waldstein (21 in C major). The final movement is almost too much beauty to bear. It's one of my top ten musical compositions.

I had been put off these great sonatas by the popularising of themes from a couple of them and had never heard of 21 till the Seinfeld episode in which the gang attend a recital given by George's new girlfriend. George skites that she will be playing the Waldstein and the others affect to be impressed - "Oh, the Waldstein.". It all ends in tears, of course.
If I remember correctly they actually played the pathetique, though.
Guess they couldn't find an actor who could play the Waldstein. :D
 

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That is funny. I love Seinfeld but haven't seen that episode in years. I love the random references to classical music they will sometimes throw in. There's an episode where George has a melody stuck in his head and Jerry compares it to when Schumann became obsessed with a single pitch and lost his mind. :lol:
 

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Bach, Brahms, Schubert, Sibelius, Mahler, Messiaen
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The great final trinity of sonatas I see as conceived as a single entity and unlike much of his music I never tire of listening to them. Besides those I like the usual suspects - Hammerklavier, Waldstein, and Tempest; but I also really like 11, 13, 18, and 28 as more “underrated” candidates.
 

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Tempest has been intimidating for me for a long time because I have arm trouble and the cross in the second movement I thought would be prohibitively difficult.
It's not. Once you get the shape of the movement, the alternating octaves in the proper rhythm, it's really lovely.
I think the first movement has no major challenges but requires the usual attention to what he's doing and how he does it. My piano has an overactive bass and so all those melodic lines on the chord in the development are a thing, as is the final left hand broken d minor chord, which is a little awkward anyway.
The last movement seems to me a perfect example of the perplexing role of the pedal in Beethoven. I think it's too dry without some pedal, but really only rewards a brush, not a wash, and those brushes have to be applied very carefully. I try to start with no pedal and only add as necessary, and I think some is necessary here, I perceive that as a step in the evolution through the pieces.
 
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