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What is your favorite quarter of a century of classical music?

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Not narrow for me.

I consider 1959 through 1964 as my favorite period.
'59 to '64? What's your passion in that five year period? There was the Poulenc Gloria, Shostakovich wrote the first cello concerto, Kodaly wrote his only symphony, Walton his second, Ligeti wrote Atmospheres, Shostakovich the Babi Yar symphony, Bernstein came out with Kaddish symphony. There was so much more - works by W. Schuman, Sessions, Stockhausen, Diamond, Henze and so many others. And so little of it is known, played or even recorded.

I voted 1875-1899. All the symphonies of Brahms, most of Tchaikovsky and Dvorak. The early Mahler and the best Bruckner. The Russian Nationalists in full bloom. An enormous part of the standard repertoire came from these 25 years.
 

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I voted 1875-1899. All the symphonies of Brahms, most of Tchaikovsky and Dvorak. The early Mahler and the best Bruckner.
My thought was just "all that Brahms, and all that everything else." Kind of unfair when history tends to diversify from Bach and thus each period is equally good, except Brahms had to show up and make the 1880s a jolly old time. Probably got a lot of chicks. But alas, I merely took a blind shot at it.

It also wonders me what Brahms' music would be if switched eras with one of the Big 3. To me the greatest hero of music.
 

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I went with 1950 - 1974.

1975- 1999 was close.
 
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I voted 1875-1899. All the symphonies of Brahms, most of Tchaikovsky and Dvorak. The early Mahler and the best Bruckner. The Russian Nationalists in full bloom. An enormous part of the standard repertoire came from these 25 years.
All of that, plus the last operas of Wagner - the Bayreuth premieres of the Ring (1876) and Parsifal (1882) - and Verdi's final masterpieces, Otello (1887) and Falstaff (1893).

My second choice would have been the 25 years after that.
 

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'59 to '64? What's your passion in that five year period?
'Sonorism' is my passion.

I did a thread specifically on 1959 during February 2019: https://www.talkclassical.com/59630-compositions-attaining-age-60-a.html?highlight=1959

1959

the first opera set in outer space, "Aniara" by Karl-Birger Blomdahl
Friedrich Cerha commences work on his monumental Spiegel series
"Le rendez-vous manqué" ballet by Michel Magne
Giacinto Scelsi's musical aesthetic matures with "Quattro pezzi per orchestra"
Gunther Schuller offers "7 Studies on Themes of Paul Klee"
"Movements for Piano & Orchestra" is late-period Stravinsky at its zenith

1960

Luciano Berio's "Circles"
Luigi Dallapiccola opens up "Dialoghi"
"Symphony No.3" by Roberto Gerhard with magnetic tape
Olivier Messiaen's "Chronochromie"
"Anaklasis" + "Threnody" by Penderecki
"3 Movements for Orchestra" by George Perle
Goffredo Petrassi's "Flute Concerto"
"The Bird Saw It All" by Henri Sauguet
Humphrey Searle's "Symphony No.3"

1961

the 7-part Spiegel is completed by Cerha
"Turner - 3 Essays for Orchestra" by Marius Constant
Morton Feldman's "Durations 3"
the first two (out of 4) tone poems by Leifs are done - "Geysir" & "Hekla" Rank these 4 tone poems by Jón Leifs in order of preference
television oratorio "Les perses" by Jean Prodromidès (the LP of which is my TC avatar icon)
Scelsi's "Aion"
"Nocturnal" by Varèse Verify valuable Varèse via vote!
"Violinkonzert" by Egon Wellesz

1962

Copland's "Connotations" (this is the facet of Aaron that I like)
"3 Questions with 2 Answers" by Dallapiccola
Benjamin Frankel's "Symphony No.2"
"Concert for 8" by Gerhard
André Jolivet's "Missa Uxor tua"
G.F. Malipiero's "Sinfonia per Antigenida"
"Samsara" by Toshiro Mayuzumi
Maurice Ohana's "Tombeau de Claude Debussy"
"Symphony No.4" by Searle
Toru Takemitsu's "Coral Island"

1963

an award-winning "Requiem" is issued forth by Wilfred Josephs
Maurice Karkoff's "Symphony No.4"
Marcel Landowski's "Piano Concerto"
"Epitaffio" by Arne Nordheim (with magnetic tape)
"Jefta" - the 5th symphony of Ernst Toch

1964

Richard Rodney Bennett's "Aubade"
"Folk Songs" by Berio
Henri Dutilleux's "Metaboles"
"Symphony No.3" by Frankel
"The Plague" oratorio by Gerhard
Vagn Holmboe's "Requiem for Nietzsche"
Jolivet's 3rd symphonie
"Infinities Projections" by Meyer Kupferman
"Dettifoss" by Leifs
the 5th symphonies of both Searle and Roger Sessions
B.A. Zimmermann's "Monolgue"
Stravinsky's "Elegy for J.F.K."

+

the first season (1963/'64) of THE OUTER LIMITS whose music scores by Dominic Frontiere started it all for me!
 

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If at all, I'd probably pick either 1781-1805 to get most of mature Haydn and Mozart (and even the latest CPE Bach) and a good chunk of middle period Beethoven.
Or 1818-1842 for most/all of late Beethoven+Schubert+ most of Mendelssohn, Schumann, Chopin, some Berlioz.
 

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1875-1899 from the choice available. The final Wagner, some of the best music from Brahms, Bruckner, Tchaikovsky and Dvorak, and early gems by Mahler and R Strauss.

A custom made preference would be 1887-1911. It would lose Parsifal, but gain all of Mahler, and a substantial part Of Sibelius.
 

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The "quartets" for flute, viola, keyboard Wq 93-95 and the double harpsichord/fortepiano concerto Wq 47 are from 1788, the last year of CPE Bach's life.
The quartets were among the first pieces of the composer I heard and I like them a lot, the double concerto is maybe a bit overrated because of the odd combination but it's still a nice piece.
 

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1875-1899 Wagner, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, Verdi, Bruckner, Saint-Saens, Borodin, Alkan, J. Strauss II, Liszt, Mussorgsky, Rimsky, Rubinstein, Massenet, Franck, Widor, Raff, Bizet, Delibes, Lalo, Sibelius, Puccini, plus young Debussy, Mahler, Richard Strauss, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Holst, Vaughan Williams, and many more, whether established, working, or as students.

The spread of the model of a standard symphony orchestra (also beyond Europe), the beginning of professional conducting and other enduring concert hall traditions, explosion of piano makers for middle class home use, and the invention of recording.

Many of the highest regarded conductors of the 20th century have been born, educated, and even made first professional steps at this time:
Toscanini, Furtwängler, Beecham, Barbirolli, Klemperer, Walter, Reiner, Boult, Monteux, Koussevitzky, Stokowski, Szell, Böhm, E. Kleiber, Mengelberg, Mitropulous, Munch, Ormandy, Knappertsbusch, Busch, de Sabata, Krauss, Ansermet, Weingartner, Scherchen, Serafin, Muck, Wood, Horenstein, Sargent...

A significant chunk of the regular performance canon and public image of classical music as we know it 120 years later comes from this period, not for nothing called La Belle Epoque.
 
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