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How about his Trovatore on EMI with Bonisolli? Any good?
Sorry, I missed this when you posted it. It's a long time since I've heard the second Karajan Trovatore. Some people like it, but the general consensus is that it is not as good as his first. I seem to remember reading that the acoustic is a bit boomy and Price a little past her best. I've never been much of a fan of Bonisolli, but I'm sure his top Cs are fine. :rolleyes:
 

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Are you still with it? I said you go on and on with Callas was boring, not what you write otherwise. Isn't it time to drop it?

P.S. No reply? It means possibly I was 'ignored.' Will wait a while and take an action myself.
Sorry I didn't leap to reply immediately. I was actually doing something else so didn't see your response until now.

It probably is time to drop it, but I found that original post of yours a little hurtful, not to mention rude. As Callas once said, and I'm sorry to bring her name up again, "Some say I have a beautiful voice, some say I have not. It is a matter of opinion. All I can say, those who don't like it shouldn't come to hear me, because if I don't like something, I simply don't bother with it."

I'm with her. If I find something or someone boring, I will just move on. I don't feele the need to tell that person so.
 

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Before the season will be over ...

Benjamin Britten: A Midsummer Night's Dream

Oberon - David Daniels
Titania - Ofelia Sala
Puck - Emil Wolk
Lysander - Gordon Gietz
Hermia - Deanne Meek
Demetrius - William Dazeley
Helena - Brgitte Hahn
Bottom - Peter Rose
Quince - Henry Waddington
Flute - Christopher Gillett
Snug - Hrold Wilson
Snout - Francisco Vas
Starveling - Andrew Foster-Williams
Theseus - Ned Barth
Hippolyta - Jean Rigby

Escolania de Montserrat
Symphony Orchestra of the Gran Teatre de Liceu

Harry Bicket

Stage Director: Robert Carsen

 

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If this recording had better sound and had included the Fontainebleau act, I'd be tempted to place the performance above the famous Giulini, which I was enjoying just a couple of days ago. As it is, I really do think the Fontainebleau act is essential as it gives us so much more context for the behaviour of Carlo and Elisabeth in the rest of the opera. The other problem with this set is the sound, which is subject to all sorts of weird balances and has a dynamic so wide as to make listening an uncomfortable experience for anyone without a sound-proofed listening room. Of course, there's always headphones, but here there are probems too, as you constantly have to adjust the volume to avoid terminal deafness. A particularly bad example is the scene at night in the Queen's garden. Carreras is recorded so distantly that you can hardly hear him. However moments later the next orchestral tutti blasts you out of your seat.

All of which is a great pity, because this is a very good performance indeed with some wonderful singing from all the soloists. Carreras and Freni have often been considered too light of voice for their respective roles, but I find them both most affecting, Carreras capturing both Carlo's instability and his desperation and Freni both dignified and noble. Cappuccilli is much more involved than he sometimes could be and Ghiaurov and Raimondi superb as Philip and the Grand Inquisitor. Act IV (or Act III, as it is here), one of the greatest scenes not only in Verdi but in all opera is quite magnificent. Karajan captures to perfection the sad despair of the opening introduction and paces the scene brilliantly from thence onwards, until Baltsa brings it to an exciting close with her thrillingly sung O don fatale.

The casting is luxurious indeed with Gruberova as Tebaldo, Van Dam as the Monk and Barbara Hendricks as the Voice from Heaven. If only the sound had been as good as on the roughly contemporaneous Aida, which was recorded in Vienna with the VPO. This was recorded in Berlin with the BPO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17,007 ·

I just received this. Pretty darn good!!! :)
Tebaldi's singing is gorgeous!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17,009 ·
My first Otello and I agree Tebaldi is wonderful. Protti's a bit dull, though, certainly no match for either Gobbi or Milnes, and I've come to prefer Vickers and Domingo in the title role.
I can see that. But del Monaco is so heroic,such a force, it;s pretty exciting !
Glad i have them all. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17,010 ·

Had to hear it again. :)
 

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Puccini: La Boheme with Freni, Pavarotti, and Karajan

Beecham’s recording is still my favorite (and I also really like Serafin’s with Tebaldi), but I’m glad to finally own this recording because it’s definitely in my top 3. When I listened to it again today I still found it very moving, especially because of the beautiful playing of the Berlin Philharmonic and the very satisfying stereo sound.

Font World Poster Landscape Publication
 

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Puccini: La Boheme with Freni, Pavarotti, and Karajan

Beecham’s recording is still my favorite (and I also really like Serafin’s with Tebaldi), but I’m glad to finally own this recording because it’s definitely in my top 3. When I listened to it again today I still found it very moving, especially because of the beautiful playing of the Berlin Philharmonic and the very satisfying stereo sound.

View attachment 172005
My first Bohème and still a firm favourite.
 
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I always thought Don Carlo referred to the four act Italian version and Don Carlos to the five act French version, but it would appear I was wrong because this version is called Don Carlos and Karajan's four act version is referred to as Don Carlo. Mind you, I have a feeling that the titles have changed from one issue to the next.

So, basically, search me!
Yeah. I’ve seen this recording in a few incarnations and the title seems to be a bit of a moveable feast. Sometimes it’s Carlo, sometimes it’s Carlos. No matter, it’s still pretty good.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17,016 ·

Is this recording any good? ;)
 
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My first Otello and I agree Tebaldi is wonderful. Protti's a bit dull, though, certainly no match for either Gobbi or Milnes, and I've come to prefer Vickers and Domingo in the title role.
I can't agree about Domingo. There is absolutely no comparison between him and Del Monaco. Vickers is good as Otello, it's a record from his earlier career where I prefer his voice, but he is not as dramatic or Italianate as Del Monaco at his best. That said, I think Del Monaco's Otello with Karajan is one of his worst, his 1954 recording with Erede, with the same principals and also in stereo is far better, as are his 1951 Mexico, 1954 Milan and 1955 New York recordings. His 1958 video recording with Carteri and Cappecchi is good too, as is his 1959 recording with Gobbi and Tucci.

My favorite Otello's are Martinelli, Del Monaco and Vinay, Vickers comes a little behind and Domingo many, many steps below.
 

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Is this recording any good? ;)
Well some will tell you that her voice had deteriorated too much by the time it was recorded (1960), but I actually prefer it to the 1954 recording, mostly because I prefer the other soloists to those in 1954, and of course it enjoys better sound. Certainly the voice is not what it was, and high notes don't always fall easily on the ear, but the interpretation has deepened since the first one. My ultimate favourite is the live La Scala performance of 1955, with Simionato, Del Monaco and Zaccaria, but this is my preferred studio recording. There's a fuller review on my blog
 

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I can't agree about Domingo. There is absolutely no comparison between him and Del Monaco. Vickers is good as Otello, it's a record from his earlier career where I prefer his voice, but he is not as dramatic or Italianate as Del Monaco at his best. That said, I think Del Monaco's Otello with Karajan is one of his worst, his 1954 recording with Erede, with the same principals and also in stereo is far better, as are his 1951 Mexico, 1954 Milan and 1955 New York recordings. His 1958 video recording with Carteri and Cappecchi is good too, as is his 1959 recording with Gobbi and Tucci.

My favorite Otello's are Martinelli, Del Monaco and Vinay, Vickers comes a little behind and Domingo many, many steps below.
I remember quite liking a Met performance with Del Monaco and De Los Angeles, but I've never really liked any of Del Monaco's studio recordings.

Vickers is my favourite Otello, followed by Domingo, although he's best seen as well as heard. The Covent Garden performance with Te Kanawa and Leiferkus is absolutely shattering.

There's s terrific Met video too with Vickers, Scotto and MacNeil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17,020 ·
Well some will tell you that her voice had deteriorated too much by the time it was recorded (1960), but I actually prefer it to the 1954 recording, mostly because I prefer the other soloists to those in 1954, and of course it enjoys better sound. Certainly the voice is not what it was, and high notes don't always fall easily on the ear, but the interpretation has deepened since the first one. My ultimate favourite is the live La Scala performance of 1955, with Simionato, Del Monaco and Zaccaria, but this is my preferred studio recording. There's a fuller review on my blog
I was being sarcastic. i received it yesterday and think its great :)
I bought it for what you said. The supporting cast and the sound. :)
 
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