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Wotan is a rather obvious choice, I agree also with Hans Sachs who is one of the few humanly human characters. The split-personality Kundry is probably too odd without some Jungian or other depth psychology.
Others seem to have their tensions resolved in ways we would not accept in a realist novel. E.g. Tristan and Isolde. Tristan killed her fiancé, she nursed him back to health as Tantris and they fell in love. But now she seems more angry about him only acting as an intermediate for Marke than about the old deception (and Morold). Then the potion restores/reveals the passion of the earlier episode
I recall a discussion years ago at a SF/fantasy forum where someone made the distinction between character-driven, plot-driven and idea-driven SF/fantasy books/sagas (or at least that's how I recall it, it's probably not exhaustive, I could imagine atmosphere or world driven as another aspect). Most literature has a mix of them but it seems fair to say that a lot of Wagner is idea-driven and that implies some strange, not terribly realistic/rounded characters. I.e. there are lots of ideas about the conflicts of power, passion, redemption etc. that are brilliantly driving these operas but the characters are more conduits for these ideas and dramatic emotions.
 

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Loge is not really a character. I have seen the comment that he is more an elemental spirit than a "god" and he certainly fades into that rôle after Rheingold.
One might also think that in Rheingold Loge is partly an "externalisation" of Wotan's subconscious, like Brunnhilde in Die Walküre. Wotan kidded himself with Loge's help that he could get out of the bargain with the Giants without problems. Similarly, Loge is then needed as sidekick to deceive Alberich, not because Wotan wouldn't be sufficiently smart and ruthless but because as Lord of contracts, he cannot do it directly himself.
A bit like the potion in Tristan & Isolde that "only" makes the real desire explicit, it obviously does'nt creat the passion.
 

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Loge is not an interesting character IMO because he has no skin in any of the games of the "Ring" (and this is a rather implausible stance within the world of these operas). This seems more evidence that he isn't really a god but, like Erda, more an elemental spirit. (The similarly elemental Rhinemaidens do have skin in the game because their gold got stolen.) He doesn't seem to care for anything, he seems unaffected by the weakening due to lack of Freya's apples etc. Consequently, he fades to merely instrumental flickering in the magic fire music, two operas before the other gods fade. When water and fire consume Valhalla and the gods at the end, I wouldn't see this as "Loge having won" but as further indication of disenchantment, from now on water is water and fire is just fire, not Loge.
 

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As I said, I think Loge becomes just a symbol for fire already at the end of Walküre and eventually mundane fire in the world after the gods. He obviously does not belong to the Valhallian gods as is clear from his famous quote at the end of Rheingold when the other gods enter Valhalla "Ihrem Ende eilen sie zu, die so stark im Bestehen sich wähnen" (this should be printed out and tacked on the walls of any president's or CEO's office...) If Loge wins, than not as a character in the play but as a force of nature. Although one point of the end does seem to be that this is not a restoration of the primeval world dominated by elementary forces (instead of nibelungs, gods, giants) but the world of men and in my view this comes along with a disenchantment of these elemental forces.
I agree that there is a hint of a "Rhinefather" (interestingly in German there is the phrase "Vater Rhein" as old fashioned honorific for the country's most important river) who might be the first water elemental in analogy to Erda and Loge.
 
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