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[...] The carbon fibre cellos I've heard actually sound pretty good.
At least to my ears, the carbon cellos are just plain bad. Hear one there
5SRDj9xGAoM at 7s
I admit two advantages: the instrument responds very quickly and it doesn't mix the notes up. I hate everything else: no depth, sounds like a piece of plastic. It's about the same difference (though smaller!) as between a guitar and a banjo.

But maybe a sandwich of graphite-balsa-graphite might be decent. The sandwich is potentially lighter than spruce at identical flexural resonance frequencies. The trial(s) would need some physicist to "predict" the thicknesses (in two fibre directions!) that reproduce the resonances of a wooden instrument.
 

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I'd love to hear a good carbon cello and change my mind! Any link?

I hope carbon cellos continue improving! As a sandwich I see a possibility to outperform spruce (...according to theory).
 

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I'd love to hear a good carbon cello and change my mind! Any link?

I hope carbon cellos continue improving! As a sandwich I see a possibility to outperform spruce (...according to theory).
Oh yes, I didn't see your comment here. I think every video I've seen of a carbon fiber has terrible audio quality, but I do concede that they aren't at the level of even mid-range wooden instruments yet. The lows sound good, the highs sound canned or kind of "pinched". So you are right. If I had a choice between a cf cello and a wooden one, I'd still probably take the wooden one. But I'd be interested to see how/if cf cellos develop. Maybe they'll hit a dead end. Aesthetically though, just as objects, there's a creepy sort of sterility to them too, when I think about it. In my heart of hearts I'd say you're probably right and in the end nothing is going to equal wood.
 

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I hope a luthier for violin/cello/etc will give kiri wood (paulownia tomentosa) a try. Computations suggest it should outperform spruce. One guitar luthier uses kiri as much as she can and is enthusiastic.

As is, carbon-epoxy instruments sound badly to my ears. But a sandwich, say with balsa, might be excellent according to computations. So luthiers shouldn't give up. At least one company seems to live from carbon instruments, so maybe they'll give a try.

I dislike the aspect of carbon fibres too, but this can improve easily.

If you must take the plane or play under a doubtful sky, you may prefer carbon fibres on that occasion even if sounding less good. Or for your little Attila who wants to start learning the cello.

Apparently, most new bows are still made of pernambuco. That's more surprising, since graphite fibres are excellent in this use and more stable over time.
 
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