Classical Music Forum banner
41 - 60 of 103 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I love Milhaud, but I seriously doubt he'd be on someone's 'Top 10' list. I mean I could be wrong of course.
Well, we have Weinberg, Bax, Medtner, Glass, Rautavaara, Glazunov, Koechlin, Jolivet, Villa-Lobos, Farrenc, Widor, Myaskovsky, John Williams, Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Vladigerov and Macca. So far. So I don’t see why not :)

But seriously. Milhaud is shamefully underrated.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #46 ·
1. Rameau
2. Ravel
3. Copland
4. Debussy
5. Tchaikovsky
6. Prokofiev
7. Handel
8. Sibelius
9. Vaughan Williams
10. Dvořák

That list is liable to change at any given moment, and a couple of composers might get shuffled around, but for now that's what I'm going with.

Update: I've edited this list three times already and can't seem to stop tinkering with it.
Rameau! Feeling less miserable now having to leave him out. Thank you!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,324 Posts
Beethoven
Bach
Mozart
Haydn
Brahms
Schubert
Schumann

These first seven are comparably easy. Now it gets very difficult as there are about 10 or so for the last 3 spots.
Probably:
Mahler
Bartok
Handel

Dvorak, Chopin, Wagner and several others would be missed. But I listen to opera so rarely now, I think I could do without Wagner. The romantic piano music I'd have, could not quite make up for Chopin but almost and I'd rather not miss all the chamber, vocal, orchestral by Schubert, Schumann, Brahms. Similarly with Mendelssohn, Dvorak. There is lots of Handel I would not need but I am more likely to listen to shorter vocal music than opera (and even Messiah is like 2/3 of a typical Handel opera in length) and I really like some other pieces and listen to this more than to any other baroque besides Bach.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
W.A. Mozart
J.S. Bach
Miklos Rozsa*
Jerry Goldsmith*
Tchaikovsky
Brahms
Beethoven
Telemann
J. Haydn
John Williams*

*= These three should be dropped out from the list if we discount film scoring, as JG wrote no concert works, and the other two don’t make it quite this high based solely on that side of their career. In that case, substitute them for Liszt, Prokofiev, and R. Strauss
 

· Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #51 ·
W.A. Mozart
J.S. Bach
Miklos Rozsa*
Jerry Goldsmith*
Tchaikovsky
Brahms
Beethoven
Telemann
J. Haydn
John Williams*

*= These three should be dropped out from the list if we discount film scoring, as JG wrote no concert works, and the other two don’t make it quite this high based solely on that side of their career. In that case, substitute them for Liszt, Prokofiev, and R. Strauss
I, for one, discount nothing (y)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter · #52 · (Edited)
You're too kind. The list was just alphabetical. If it were ranked, I'm not sure where Debussy would end up, but not at the very top. For me, the indispensable Debussy is the piano music and the chamber music. The major orchestral works leave me quite cold, and I have yet to catch the Pelléas bug.
For ages I struggled with Debussy's most popular orchestral work (La mer; or is Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune the most popular? Well, I struggled with both). I generally had no problem with Nocturnes, Images, Jeux. But anyway, in the end the penny dropped. I think it helped to put the music in context (but I'm sure you've tried that)--Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune on the back of Bruckner 9 and so forth. (Decades ago Parsifal was an ear-opener too, hearing the things Debussy must have heard, the things he picked up before rejecting Wagner, Brahms, L’Allemagne.) Just to see where he was coming from. He was suffocating. I'm a big fan of Wagner and Bruckner, I love Brahms, but I can nonetheless very much sympathize. Just the first few bars of Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune--it's a new world. Thank God Debussy invented modernism!
 

· Registered
Glazunov, Tchaikovsky, Myaskovsky, Rachmaninoff, Bruckner, Massenet, Schumann, Wagner, Strauss, Bax.
Joined
·
2,203 Posts
My Top Ten:
  • Glazunov, Alexander
  • Tchaikovsky, Pyotr
  • Myaskovsky, Nikolai
  • Rachmaninoff, Sergei
  • Shostakovich, Dmitri
  • Bruckner, Anton
  • Massenet, Jules
  • Puccini, Giacomo
  • Nielsen, Carl
  • Bax, Sir Arnold
Honorable mentions:
  • Popov, Gavriil
  • Shebalin, Vissarion
  • Prokofiev, Sergei
  • Tchaikovsky, Boris
  • Sibelius, Jean
  • Melartin, Erkki
  • Merikanto, Aarre
  • Skulte, Adolfs
  • Lehar, Franz
  • Creston, Paul
  • Ives, Charles
  • Diamond, David
  • Wagner, Richard
  • Strauss, Richard
  • Mahler, Gustav
  • Dvorak, Antonin
  • Suk, Josef
  • Janacek, Leos
  • Elgar, Sir Edward
  • Stanford, Sir Charles Villiers
  • Tubin, Edward
 

· Registered
Debussy, Mahler, Strauss, Sibelius, Bartók
Joined
·
6,516 Posts
You're too kind. The list was just alphabetical. If it were ranked, I'm not sure where Debussy would end up, but not at the very top. For me, the indispensable Debussy is the piano music and the chamber music. The major orchestral works leave me quite cold, and I have yet to catch the Pelléas bug.
Ah, but what about his mélodies? Personally, I love all aspects of his oeuvre ---- from the solo piano works (but also those works for two pianos like En blanc et noir for example), orchestral works, mélodies (along with other vocal works like La Damoiselle élue or the incidental music for Le Martyre de saint Sébastien), Pelléas et Mélisande and the chamber music.
 
41 - 60 of 103 Posts
Top